I usually sit on the left of the entrance

Most regular users at the British Library have a favourite seat. It appears that this has always been the case. In 1928 the mysterious ‘W’ sent a postcard from the British Museum in London to a female friend or relative in Ireland, in which he explained where he usually sat to carry out his research. The front of the card shows the Reading Room with its distinctive circular layout. Since the mid-nineteenth century, the British Library had been located in the great court at the British Museum but it 1997 it moved to purpose-built library premises near Kings Cross.

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The rear of the postcard is covered in cramped handwriting and signed Y.E.L. W; that is, your ever loving ‘W’ (William? Walter? Wilfred?).

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The message is dated 23 January 1928. It includes a description of the British Museum reading room (‘a beautiful, large, roomy place, well-warmed…’) as well as some incomplete data on ‘W’s research topics and processes. In full, the message reads:

Monday morning.

Many thanks for sending the Gazette, which I was glad to receive; the report of Mr Hammond’s Dublin Anniversary address has raised one or two interesting new lines to me. I shall be glad of any help, and thank you for thinking of it. I have most of the literature now; but if any old magazines (July 1927; or before October 1926) are available (without trouble), I should be happy to receive them. I see in the leaflet “Who is sufficient…” the snap of nine of the Lisburne family. Olive seems quite happy with her companions!

Liley [?] says, in a note, that, if I write to you before she does, I have to say thank you very much for the photo. They are evidently very pleased.

Thank you for your letter of Saturday. The “idea” you raise is just the very thing, and I hope that it will be possible. HBR returns this week – he is away in the South – and perhaps we can get things fixed up more definitely soon. The weekend or so will be to me much more than “restful”! I am really glad, too, to come and see the works.

We had rather a quiet Sunday evening, with 14 in; but it was nice to have it quieter and less crowded.

This is P.P.C. [picture postcard] no.7 (I think!). The Reading Room is a beautiful, large, roomy place, well-warmed and well provided with splendid desks. It holds about 400 or 500 seats. The picture is taken from the entrance (the passage under the clock is the Inner Library). I usually sit on the left of the entrance. The round shelves in the centre hold the Catalogue. The room is usually crowded. I am hoping (despite 2 or 3 meetings this afternoon and evening) to write a short letter and to post it tomorrow. D. sends her love (and W.D., too!). Y.E.L.  W.

The postcard recipient is a Miss Dodwell. Her address is given as Manor House Home, a children’s home in Lisburn near Belfast in Ireland. Manor House Home opened in 1927, the year before this postcard was written. ‘W’ expresses an interest in coming to ‘see the works’ a hope that suggests Miss Dodwell is involved in managing the home in some way. But there is no way of knowing this for sure from the message, just as there is no way of discovering, without further research, whether ‘W’ and Miss Dodwell were sisters, cousins, comrades, friends or sweethearts.

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